The Cayman Reporter http://www.caymanreporter.com News and Information for the Cayman Islands Thu, 24 Sep 2015 11:15:58 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.9.9 ‘No need to panic,’ says Bankers Association http://www.caymanreporter.com/2015/09/24/no-need-panic-says-bankers-association/ http://www.caymanreporter.com/2015/09/24/no-need-panic-says-bankers-association/#comments Thu, 24 Sep 2015 11:15:58 +0000 http://www.caymanreporter.com/?p=18268 Cayman Islands Bankers’ Association president Mark McIntyre says there is no “scarcity” of US on the local market as local banks have been stocking up on the in-demand currency. In fact, Mr McIntyre, who is also Managing Director & Country Head, Cayman Islands & British Virgin Islands for CIBC FirstCaribbean International Bank (Cayman) Limited, says […]

The post ‘No need to panic,’ says Bankers Association appeared first on The Cayman Reporter.

]]>
Cayman Islands Bankers' Association President Mark McIntyre

Cayman Islands Bankers’
Association President Mark McIntyre

Cayman Islands Bankers’ Association president Mark McIntyre says there is no “scarcity” of US on the local market as local banks have been stocking up on the in-demand currency.

In fact, Mr McIntyre, who is also Managing Director & Country Head, Cayman Islands & British Virgin Islands for CIBC FirstCaribbean International Bank (Cayman) Limited, says he, like Financial Services Minister Hon Wayne Panton, believes the US shortage situation is “temporary.”

“We will come up with a solution that works for everybody but it has to involve government, the banks, CIMA (Cayman Islands Monetary Authority) and MSPs (Money Services Providers,)” he said yesterday as the Bankers Association broke its silence on the issue.

Mr McIntyre, speaking exclusively to the Cayman Reporter yesterday, said that all of the stakeholders have to agree to the rules on the playing field and recognise the changes that were made going forward.

“We have been and remain in constant dialogue with the Ministry of Financial Services, CIMA and all stakeholders that we need to engage with to bring a satisfactory conclusion in this matter,” he said.

Mr McIntyre said that the major “influencer” of the current situation was the MSPs decision to only accept US dollars to transact money transfers and that has created the “heightened demand” for US cash.

However Mr McIntyre said contrary to some media reports US dollars are available at banks. He said CIBC/FCIB has also been impacted by the high demand and had to make adjustments, as other banks have done.

“Banks have adjusted and are shipping in money. It does not take long to get US dollars in here, within a day or two. So banks probably now, based on what happened in the last couple of days, are now carrying higher US dollars to now accommodate the new world order as it is today,” he said.

Mr Mc Intyre said, however, the situation has to be addressed somehow “so that we are not in a position where we continually have to make more frequent orders of cash which in the end costs the bank money and in the end costs clients more money.”

Minister Panton indicated on government radio that the Progressives-led administration is working on finding a solution to the problem.

The high demand for US cash has also driven the cost of the US dollar from CI84 cents to CI89 cents.

Mr McIntyre admitted that some banks have taken the position that they will only sell US currency to their account holders, which has placed a further burden on the local market. However he stressed that collaboration is needed.

“The decision that some banks not to sell to non-customers has put strain on other banks like myself because we are still in business with non-customers and the decisions that everyone is making is having an impact on this thing overall. We all need to communicate and engage and come up with a workable solution, which is why I support the minister’s comment that this temporary,” he added.

He also stressed that CIBC/FCIB is not limiting who its sells its US cash to nor is there a limit in the amount that can be purchased.

“CIBC has US cash for its customers and CIBC/FICB is also extending the courtesy to non-customers to purchase US at a fee. As for other banks, I do not have all the info. I understand that other banks are only providing US purchases for clients of their banks that is a differentiation of my bank and members of the association. So it is not a common approach to every situation,” he explained.

Mr McIntyre added that even though there is a Bankers’ Association “we are competing against each other.”

“My bank took the decision to sell to non-customers and other banks took other decisions and that is their remit and that is their choice. We collaborate on industry issues; we do not collude on pricing issues. We are competitors,” he contended.

Mr McIntyre said at this point he had no evidence of any hoarding of US cash on the local market, but he said his bank has been monitoring the purchasing patterns of clients and non-clients.

“Our banking industry or financial services industry is based on confidence and if people believe that there is a big problem here then people will begin hoarding, it is a self fulfilling prophecy. If we say there is a scarity everybody will come and buy US and we do not want that kind of panic and fear to enter the community and become a self fulfilling prophecy,” he said.

Filed by Reshma Ragoonath

The post ‘No need to panic,’ says Bankers Association appeared first on The Cayman Reporter.

]]>
http://www.caymanreporter.com/2015/09/24/no-need-panic-says-bankers-association/feed/ 0
CoP attends global military security conference http://www.caymanreporter.com/2015/09/24/cop-attends-global-military-security-conference/ http://www.caymanreporter.com/2015/09/24/cop-attends-global-military-security-conference/#comments Thu, 24 Sep 2015 11:14:52 +0000 http://www.caymanreporter.com/?p=18271 Commissioner of Police David Baines recently spent a week in Germany attending an international military security conference. Mr Baines was a delegate at the Senior Executive Seminar 15-09, held from 14 to 18 September at the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany. The leader of the Royal Cayman Islands Police […]

The post CoP attends global military security conference appeared first on The Cayman Reporter.

]]>
Commissioner of Police David Baines at the Senior Executive Seminar held at the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies in Germany.

Commissioner of Police David Baines at the Senior Executive Seminar held at the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies in Germany.

Commissioner of Police David Baines recently spent a week in Germany attending an international military security conference.

Mr Baines was a delegate at the Senior Executive Seminar 15-09, held from 14 to 18 September at the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany.

The leader of the Royal Cayman Islands Police Service (RCIPS) was invited to attend by Mark Ridley, deputy director of Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) in Washington D.C.

His attendance was organised and funded by the US Department of the Navy.

“Mr Baines trip to the security seminar at the Marshall Centre for Security Studies was not funded by the RCIPS and there was no cost to the Cayman Islands’ government,” a spokesperson from the RCIPS said in response to questions from the Cayman Reporter.

“The CoP flew economy class and stayed in military barracks, as the Center is located on a military base,” the RCIPS spokesperson noted.

Mr Ridley described why he thought it important that Mr Baines attend, saying in an article on the Marshall Center website,“I thought he would benefit from this course not only to strengthen the relationship he has with us (NCIS), but also for him to build relationships with professionals across the globe.”

The NCIS deputy director said his professional relationship with Mr Baines is an important one because he is also the president of the Caribbean Association of Chiefs of Police and has influence with 27 islands in the Caribbean.

Mr Ridley explained, “The Caribbean is extremely important to (the U.S. Navy) – it’s a blind spot to us – the Navy does not have the resources in the region that we once we had and it’s really important to us to have people there who we can reach out to for situational awareness.”

An NCIS agent for 28 years and deputy director for more than five years, Mr Ridley said, “We are concerned about regional problems, such as the flow of drugs, guns and bad guys who transit from the Caribbean to the U.S., which impacts crime in the U.S.”

Mr Ridley was also a panel member at SES, focusing on a discussion of “Strengths, Weaknesses and Opportunities in Law Enforcement and Counterterrorism.”

In his presentation, Mr Ridley said, “Terrorist and transnational organised crime threats are prevalent in the world right now. It’s global, complex and high tech. There are no boundaries – these serious threats cross jurisdictions and disciplines.”

“It’s critical for all of us to understand our domain, to share information and to collaborate on policing,” he said.

The overall focus of the SES this year was on “21st Century Converging Threats: Nexus of Terrorism, Drugs and Illicit Trafficking.”

The five-day seminar showcased lectures from international experts who specialise in terrorism and organised crime.  The Marshall Center website said it also included “smaller group-discussions designed to build trust and understanding between the nations’ participants to find common ground for cooperative responses.”

SES course director Italian Brig. Gen. Luigi Francavilla said, “Our goal in bringing together a diverse group of subject-matter experts to discuss topics that look at the relationship between two of the major concerns the international community is facing today – terrorism and organized crime.”

On the Marshall Center website, Mr Baines said, “…this seminar has given me a better capability of understanding the complexities involved in the nexus between criminality and terrorism.”

As the first attendee from the Cayman Islands, he said, “Knowing the methodology and the trends that are emerging – at least – allow me to be aware, look for indicators and ask the intelligent questions of my staff so we are better able to recognise the threat. Hopefully, we can do something about it and do our part to work collectively to make it a safer world.”

The RCIPS spokesperson told the Cayman Reporter that Mr Baines “was invited to the conference both in his capacity of RCIPS CoP but also as the President of the Association of Caribbean Commissioners of Police.”

According to the Marshall Center website, this year’s seminar included 73 representatives from 40 countries, including “an executive mix where 60 per cent serve in military leadership positions and the other 40 per cent are civilians in high-government office.”

Asked about the focus of the seminar, the RCIPS spokesperson said, “The event examined global threats stemming from the violence and global destabilisation emanating from conflicts in the Middle East. It focused on two aspects: the flow of fighters from outside the Middle East into the conflict and the threats they can pose when they return, as well as international money flows and how global terrorism is being financed.”

“There have been 100 fighters from the Caribbean region who have gone to Syria to join ISIS – this is a relevant issue for us. Moreover, our role as the fifth largest banking centre in the world brings with it the responsibility to ensure that we are not facilitating the financing of terrorism, and the conference informed about both short-term and long-term threats in this area as well,” the RCIPS spokesperson said.

Questioned on how the Cayman Islands will benefit from Mr Baines’ attendance at the seminar, the RCIPS spokesperson said, “By attending this conference Mr Baines was able to gather important information for our policing operations and evaluation of the threats the Cayman Islands face in both the security and financial spheres, as well as the contacts that are absolutely critical for effective and collaborative international police work.”

She further noted that heads of national defense and high-ranking police and military from around the world were also in attendance.

“The Commissioner’s attendance at the conference not only provided us with information critical to our work and assessment of potential threats to the islands, it also elevated the Cayman Islands’ standing in the security sphere as it was the first time that representatives from the region have been included in such an event,” the RCIPS spokesperson said.

When asked who was in charge of the RCIPS in Mr Baines’ absence, the RCIPS spokesperson answered, “In the CoP’s absence there are two Deputy Commissioners, both highly experienced, who fill in.”

On the Marshal Center website, Mr Baines is quoted as saying, “(The seminar lectures) were beneficial to me. It has given me a better availability to understand the complexes involved not just from the single position of law enforcement, but actually in identifying if it’s going to be law enforcement, military or political solution.”

Mr Baines said, “For these serious threats, it’s not just one, but a collection of all of those. However, the most beneficial part (of this seminar) is that you meet people, and you develop a trust and relationship with them that will extend way beyond this week. If we don’t have the answer to a particular problem, there are a lot of people here who have a lot of capability and vast amount of experience that you can call on.”

The Marshall Center website notes that it boasts a “network of almost 11,000 alumni from 149 nations.”

The Marshall Center is described on its website as “a unique German-American partnership and is named after U.S. Army Gen. George C. Marshall, who developed a sweeping economic recovery program for post World War II Europe.”

In the article on the Marshall Center website, Mr Baines said, “If there is a legacy on how we can solve the problems of the future, the Marshall Center does it on a daily basis, based on an idea and concept created by General Marshall that established a safer world built on an ideology and morality.”

“I actually see that living proof by the relationships and ideas that came out of the discussions that have taken place over the last five days in SES,” Mr Baines said.

Filed by Tina Trumbach

The post CoP attends global military security conference appeared first on The Cayman Reporter.

]]>
http://www.caymanreporter.com/2015/09/24/cop-attends-global-military-security-conference/feed/ 0
Controlling the message http://www.caymanreporter.com/2015/09/24/controlling-the-message/ http://www.caymanreporter.com/2015/09/24/controlling-the-message/#comments Thu, 24 Sep 2015 11:13:27 +0000 http://www.caymanreporter.com/?p=18275 It’s interesting how a piece of factual information could be painted in different shades, to the point where the message disseminated to the public could vary depending on the chosen shade. We’ve seen this demonstrated with the recently released Benthic Habitat Characterisation Survey, a report that took a focused look at the seabed in the […]

The post Controlling the message appeared first on The Cayman Reporter.

]]>
Viewpoint

It’s interesting how a piece of factual information could be painted in different shades, to the point where the message disseminated to the public could vary depending on the chosen shade.

We’ve seen this demonstrated with the recently released Benthic Habitat Characterisation Survey, a report that took a focused look at the seabed in the George Town Harbour area and the impact of the construction of a cruise berthing facility.

It was revealed that more than two thirds of the coral cannot be successfully relocated, due to the young nature of the organisms. In the same breath, you could say around 33 per cent of the live coral is suitable for relocation – what some might consider a “significant” amount.

Depending on the tone you take to spin the facts, it can either support or discredit the need for the two finger pier in the capital.

The consultants believe around 116,800 hard corals and over 17,000 soft corals from a total of almost 453,000 coral heads at risk in the 32.5-acre area could be moved. Government, in its release on the findings, seemed to take a positive tone about those findings.

“This survey is both necessary and timely, particularly in light of the differing views and opinions about precisely what exists within the area of impact and how it could potentially be affected if the project proceeded,” said Deputy Premier and Minister for Tourism Hon Moses Kirkconnell.

Also interesting to note is the seabed survey was undertaken by marine environmental consultants CSA Ocean Sciences Inc that has what government calls “extensive experience in coral reattachment as a means of accelerating habitat recovery. The report states that mitigation options which include coral translocation and the establishment of coral nurseries were considered by CSA to be suitable for the George Town Harbour Berthing Project.”

While government says it has not made a decision yet, the tone of the message leaves us inclined to believe the port is a foregone conclusion.

We are told to take comfort by government saying it has “a responsibility and duty of care to ensure that our collective decision is based on sound scientific evidence, not speculation or impassioned pleas, however well intended those might be.”

Again, it’s all in how the message is packaged.

What government needs to consider is where the 30 per cent of coral can be relocated to and at what cost? It also needs to think about whether that figure is entirely realistic. We’d be willing to wager it is merely a hopeful estimate. And we’re sure the mitigation measures will cost a pretty penny.

Also to be considered is the financing model for what could end up being the country’s largest capital project, even bigger than the mammoth $200m schools project. Little doubt, this might involve some kind of injection from cruise line(s) or financing from some other party. At that stage, what will the liners demand from the country?

Still yet to be seen is an economic impact assessment, for the country from this project, not just are port confined to the capital’s borders. Without that, we’re sailing blindly on this one.

We wait for government’s definitive decision on the matter. But the key question to be asked is this: Who are we building the port for?

We’re keen to see how the message will be dressed once the decision is taken.

The post Controlling the message appeared first on The Cayman Reporter.

]]>
http://www.caymanreporter.com/2015/09/24/controlling-the-message/feed/ 0
MLA asks law firms to play ball http://www.caymanreporter.com/2015/09/24/mla-asks-law-firms-play-ball/ http://www.caymanreporter.com/2015/09/24/mla-asks-law-firms-play-ball/#comments Thu, 24 Sep 2015 11:12:07 +0000 http://www.caymanreporter.com/?p=18277 In response to the Cayman Islands Law Society’s public declaration of its “wholehearted” support for his aim to advance Caymanians in the legal profession, MLA Winston Connolly is asking Cayman’s law firms to sign on the dotted line. Two weeks ago, the George Town MLA issued a call to action to all law firms operating […]

The post MLA asks law firms to play ball appeared first on The Cayman Reporter.

]]>
George Town MLA and qualified lawyer Winston Connolly is going to bat for Caymanian lawyers.

George Town MLA and qualified lawyer Winston Connolly is going to bat for Caymanian lawyers.

In response to the Cayman Islands Law Society’s public declaration of its “wholehearted” support for his aim to advance Caymanians in the legal profession, MLA Winston Connolly is asking Cayman’s law firms to sign on the dotted line.

Two weeks ago, the George Town MLA issued a call to action to all law firms operating in the Cayman Islands supporting the advancement of Caymanian attorneys to partnership and management positions.

A week after his appeal, Mr Connolly told the Cayman Reporter, “I have not had any law firms sign up to my Statement of Goals but thankfully the Council of the Caymanian Bar Association has.”

Subsequently, Cayman Islands Law Society president Alasdair Robertson sent a letter to the editor affirming the society’s “wholehearted” support for Mr Connolly’s goals.

The freshman MLA and qualified attorney thinks more local lawyers should be equity partners in the country’s top law firms – lucrative positions in which salaries can range from around US$1 million to $10 million.

With his call to action and request that they sign on to his “Statement of Goals,” Mr Connolly issued a “personal challenge” to all law firms in the Cayman Islands to double the number of Caymanian equity partners by 2020, noting that only four Caymanians out of over 600 lawyers in the Caymans Islands are equity partners.

When his call went unanswered, Mr Connolly said, “I hope other people see the issues facing the legal profession.”

Following Mr Robertson’s letter, Mr Connolly is taking further action, asking the big law firms to make their stated support formal by signing on to his pledge and examining their practices with regard to hiring, retention and advancement of Caymanian lawyers.

“I am going to put this formally to the CILS [Cayman Islands Law Society] and CBA [Caymanian Bar Assocation] tomorrow and ask them to review and confirm they are doing each of these things specifically or if not that they will adopt them since the CILS has now given wholehearted support to the underlying principles of my statements and have noted that they broadly reflect their commitment paper,” Mr Connolly said in an email to local media on 22 September.

He said that since the law society and the firms it represents have stated their support, signing on to his aims should be a matter of course.

“Given that adoption, then it should be almost academic to sign on to these specific goals and to make a commitment to young Caymanian lawyers, the Government of the Cayman Islands and Caymanian mothers and fathers who share and support their children’s aspirations of becoming lawyers and excelling in their chosen professions in a very public way,” Mr Connolly said.

In addition to this formal request asking the law firms to prove their intentions, Mr Connolly is also asking them to provide some related data in order to inform government policy on the issue.

His questions ask for the specific numbers of Caymanians in various levels at all law firms operating in the Cayman Islands.

His first question is, “Of your over 400 members, how many are associate partners? How many are equity partners? And how many are Caymanian?”

The qualified lawyer also asks about the number of scholarships, articled clerkships, and associates by firm since 2005; how many Caymanians have left Cayman firms on a per firm basis, and how many are practicing and non-practicing; the number of articled clerks prior to 2008 and broken down by firm; and the number of work permits obtained by Cayman law firms and hires internationally between 2008 and 2014.

Mr Connolly also asks, “What is the ultimate goal of scholarships, internships, training etc. designed for new lawyers ‘to develop the skills required to make it to the top of what is an incredibly demanding profession”?”

He further wants to know, “Of the lawyers provided scholarships and internships as well as mentoring and training measures since 2001 how many have become associate partners and equity partners in law firms?”

Additionally, he asks, “Have the programmes above been evaluated for success by the societies and the law firms?”

And he wants to know, what the opportunities are for Caymanian lawyers in the law firms, with supporting data.

Getting to the meat of the issue, Mr Connolly also wants to know how many equity partners were Caymanian when they did their articles and how many current Caymanian partners were people who started their careers in the Cayman Islands on work permits.

He is asking the law firms how people become partners in Cayman law firms. “Is there a transparent policy in each law firm communicated frequently to all employees?” Mr Connolly asks.

He also want to know what the Cayman Islands Law Society, the Caymanian Bar Association and the individual law firms’ targets are for Caymanian associate partners, and the same for Caymanian equity partners.

In his letter, Mr Robertson highlighted the number of articled clerks and associates in the larger Cayman law firms.

Mr Connolly said, “I am also encouraged by the strong commitment by the larger firms to attracting and keeping Caymanian talent, but I would like to see the realisation of this commitment in the statistics. It should not be an issue then to also provide the number of articled clerkships since 2005 per firm (year by year) and the number of Caymanian lawyers who did articles in Cayman since 2005 again on a per firm basis.”

He continued, “I was also happy to see that nearly 100 Caymanian lawyers have been admitted since 2008 and that these are all receiving training, internships and mentorships, after a number of them received scholarships. Again, what is the number of Caymanians made up to salary partner and equity partner in the same period and by firm? What would also be helpful is to show the number of lawyers admitted in the Cayman Islands in the same period who were not Caymanian. “

Mr Connolly said that pledges to promote diversity are commonplace in other jurisdictions, and should also be in place here.

“Onshore law firms and other professions have made this commitment and have signed similar pledges. One just has to look at the NYC Bar Association, the Law Society of England and Wales (“LSEW”) -of which I am a member (non-practising), the International Bar Association…and others to see the push that they are making for minority participation in the partnership arena. This now universal concept is nothing original by me, nor is it something which is out of the mainstream,” Mr Connolly said.

He noted LSEW specifically and the “efforts they are making to highlight the business case for diversity.”

He said this should be nothing new to many of the foreign-born and trained lawyers currently controlling the legal profession in the Cayman Islands.

“This is the same body that would have governed a number of the firms that the majority of the foreign lawyers in Cayman are coming from, were trained at and although guidance only-should be very persuasive,” Mr Connolly said.

Mr Robertson referred to a long-awaited draft bill intended to govern the Cayman legal profession as a means to achieve Mr Connolly’s goals.

“Mr Connolly should be pleased to see that the ethos of the Legal Practitioners Bill is also aligned with his Statement of Goals in that it will encapsulate guidelines for Cayman-based law firms in providing Caymanians access to the legal profession, the training and development of Caymanian attorneys and the opportunities for career progression for Caymanian lawyers,” Mr Robertson said.

In answer to this, Mr Connolly said, “Once I have an opportunity to see the draft LPB [Legal Practitioners Bill] which I understand has been delivered to some of my colleagues, I will be happy to see if it broadly reflects the statement of goals I have produced and endeavours to use best efforts to achieve what I’ve set out…”

But basically, Mr Connolly says the numbers have to prove the law firms’ commitment to Caymanian advancement in the profession.

“Along with the ethos of the draft LPB and guidelines for Cayman based law firms with respect to finding, developing and promoting Caymanian talent, there has to be accountability, that is measurable and demonstrable. The proof will be in the numbers,” he said.

The political representative said a framework has to be put in place putting requirements on the law firms.

“…it would be good to have the commitment to the country that each Caymanian lawyer has or will have an individual progression plan, filed and updated each year as part of the Business Staffing Plan for each firm and that a diversity plan be put in place for each member firm of the CILS so that cultural differences and conscious or unconscious bias to promoting Caymanians (the minorities in Cayman law firms in respect of number of attorneys) can be eradicated,” Mr Connolly said.

He noted, “The world is doing this, major counterpart law firms in the US, UK and Canada are doing this. Cayman accounting firms are doing this. Why should Cayman law firms be exempt?”

Filed by Tina Trumbach

The post MLA asks law firms to play ball appeared first on The Cayman Reporter.

]]>
http://www.caymanreporter.com/2015/09/24/mla-asks-law-firms-play-ball/feed/ 0
Law enforcement conducts anti-smuggling exercise http://www.caymanreporter.com/2015/09/24/law-enforcement-conducts-anti-smuggling-exercise/ http://www.caymanreporter.com/2015/09/24/law-enforcement-conducts-anti-smuggling-exercise/#comments Thu, 24 Sep 2015 11:11:03 +0000 http://www.caymanreporter.com/?p=18280 A joint effort between law enforcement took place as Air Operations Unit (AOU) and the Joint Marine Unit (JMU) deployed air and marine assets out of Grand Cayman and Cayman Brac as part of an anti-smuggling exercise. The deployment took place off the Sister Islands and Grand Cayman on18-19 September and covered all waters between […]

The post Law enforcement conducts anti-smuggling exercise appeared first on The Cayman Reporter.

]]>
The Police Helicopter at Charles Kirkconnell International Airport

The Police Helicopter at Charles Kirkconnell International Airport

A joint effort between law enforcement took place as Air Operations Unit (AOU) and the Joint Marine Unit (JMU) deployed air and marine assets out of Grand Cayman and Cayman Brac as part of an anti-smuggling exercise.

The deployment took place off the Sister Islands and Grand Cayman on18-19 September and covered all waters between Grand Cayman and the Sister Islands, extending 60 miles off the Sister Islands towards Jamaica.

The Joint Marine Unit vessel Defender

The Joint Marine Unit vessel Defender

Uniform police from Cayman Brac provided support to these exercises from land. Assets deployed included the police helicopter, JMU vessels Niven D and Defender, and the Custom Service’s Cayman Brac vessel Defender II, as well as personnel from the Drugs and Serious Crimes Task Force.

Insp. Wendy Parchment, Area Commander for the Sister Islands, welcomed the comprehensive exercises, which she described as “very reassuring, because they demonstrate that we in the Sister Islands can look forward to robust support and response when smuggling activity is suspected or reported.”
During the exercises, an undisclosed quantity of ganja was recovered.

The post Law enforcement conducts anti-smuggling exercise appeared first on The Cayman Reporter.

]]>
http://www.caymanreporter.com/2015/09/24/law-enforcement-conducts-anti-smuggling-exercise/feed/ 0
Campbells names scholarship recipients http://www.caymanreporter.com/2015/09/24/campbells-names-scholarship-recipients/ http://www.caymanreporter.com/2015/09/24/campbells-names-scholarship-recipients/#comments Thu, 24 Sep 2015 11:10:31 +0000 http://www.caymanreporter.com/?p=18286 Kira March and Zachary Powery, two summer interns for Campbells, have been named as the firm’s 2015 undergraduate scholarship recipients. “Kira and Zachary both exemplify the qualities we look for when considering scholarship applications and we are proud to support these bright and promising students with their educational endeavours,” says Nicole D’Heer Watson, Marketing Manager. […]

The post Campbells names scholarship recipients appeared first on The Cayman Reporter.

]]>
(L-R) Alan Craig, Partner; Kira March; Zachary Powery; and John Wolf, Partner and Head of Corporate.

(L-R) Alan Craig, Partner; Kira March; Zachary Powery; and John Wolf, Partner and Head of Corporate.

Kira March and Zachary Powery, two summer interns for Campbells, have been named as the firm’s 2015 undergraduate scholarship recipients.

“Kira and Zachary both exemplify the qualities we look for when considering scholarship applications and we are proud to support these bright and promising students with their educational endeavours,” says Nicole D’Heer Watson, Marketing Manager.

Both Ms March and Mr Powery spent the summer learning more about the firm, working in the marketing and accounting departments, respectively.

“I am truly grateful to Campbells for recognising my potential and extend a sincere thank you to Campbells for helping to make my educational goals a reality, which would not have been possible without their support,” Mr Powery said.

He is entering his fourth year at Edinburgh Napier University, where he is studying for a BA (Hons) in Accounting with Law. Mr Powery plans to become a Certified Accountant and is now considering paralegal studies after completing his degree.

With a passion for athletics, Ms March is entering her first year at St Francis Xavier University in Antigonish, Nova Scotia where she will pursue a Bachelor of Science in Human Kinetics. Upon her return to the Cayman Islands, she hopes to use her degree to work with athletes.

“I am so appreciative of the opportunity Campbells has afforded me, not only with financial assistance, but with their continued support and guidance throughout their summer internship programme, which has provided me with invaluable experience,” Ms March said.

Campbells has been advising both local and international clients on Cayman Islands and British Virgin Islands law for 43 years. The firm offers scholarship opportunities to Caymanian students studying law and other subjects. They consider applications annually, and may grant a scholarship to one or more applicants.

John Wolf, Partner and Head of Corporate described this year’s scholarship recipients as “promising” and said he is pleased that Campbells is able to support them.

He added, “We trust both Kira and Zachary will do great things upon completing their studies and it is evident that they both have promising futures ahead of them.”

The post Campbells names scholarship recipients appeared first on The Cayman Reporter.

]]>
http://www.caymanreporter.com/2015/09/24/campbells-names-scholarship-recipients/feed/ 0
Chamber of Commerce to host small business workshops http://www.caymanreporter.com/2015/09/24/chamber-commerce-host-small-business-workshops/ http://www.caymanreporter.com/2015/09/24/chamber-commerce-host-small-business-workshops/#comments Thu, 24 Sep 2015 11:09:35 +0000 http://www.caymanreporter.com/?p=18289 The Cayman Islands Chamber of Commerce will be providing further support to small businesses, thanks to a contract with the Ministry of Commerce to host a series of workshops. The Department of Commerce and Investment (DCI) previously hosted the workshops, but determined that outsourcing the events would help the DCI better focus on licensing and […]

The post Chamber of Commerce to host small business workshops appeared first on The Cayman Reporter.

]]>
Chamber of Commerce CEO Wil Pineau and Ministry of Commerce Deputy Chief Officer Tamara Ebanks signed off on the contract. Photo credit: Matthew Yates, MFSCE.

Chamber of Commerce CEO Wil Pineau and Ministry of Commerce Deputy Chief Officer Tamara Ebanks signed off on the contract. Photo credit: Matthew Yates, MFSCE.

The Cayman Islands Chamber of Commerce will be providing further support to small businesses, thanks to a contract with the Ministry of Commerce to host a series of workshops.

The Department of Commerce and Investment (DCI) previously hosted the workshops, but determined that outsourcing the events would help the DCI better focus on licensing and regulation, Commerce Minister Hon Wayne Panton explained.

The contract was awarded on 25 August after a tendering process. According to the agreement, the Chamber will begin hosting interactive sessions in October, using the expertise of its membership as facilitators.

“Government is committed to the support of small businesses and given their dominance in our economy, their success translates to growth in our economy, expanded job creation and support for our middle class,” Minister Panton said. “The continuation of small business workshops will greatly assist entrepreneurs by providing them with opportunities to improve their skills in a range of key management areas to promote strength and growth.”

“The Chamber is pleased to have been awarded the contract to deliver free workshops that will benefit micro and small businesses in the Cayman Islands,” Chamber CEO Wil Pineau said.

He added that the 90-minute workshops are free and will take place monthly. Sessions will focus on a number of areas that affect small businesses, such as regulatory matters, marketing, social media, banking and finance, business planning, human resources, debt collection and management.

“The workshops are intended to improve small businesses by providing them with useful information and guidance on key topics. We look forward to working in partnership with the Ministry of Commerce in the months ahead,” Mr Pineau said.

Minister Panton said that outsourcing the workshops is part of Government’s enhancements for small business, which includes the recently announced extension of incentives for micro and small business owners until 31 August 2016.

Additionally, small businesses continue to benefit from additional steps taken by Government to lower the costs of doing business. Some steps include reducing the import duty for licensed traders from 22 per cent to 20 per cent in 2014; the 25 cent/gallon reduction in fuel duty for CUC’s pass through of fuel cost in January of this year; and the further reduction, by another 25 cents, for an aggregate of 50 cents reduction in fuel duty per gallon to be in place in January 2016.

The post Chamber of Commerce to host small business workshops appeared first on The Cayman Reporter.

]]>
http://www.caymanreporter.com/2015/09/24/chamber-commerce-host-small-business-workshops/feed/ 0
5 mistakes healthy people make http://www.caymanreporter.com/2015/09/24/5-mistakes-healthy-people-make/ http://www.caymanreporter.com/2015/09/24/5-mistakes-healthy-people-make/#comments Thu, 24 Sep 2015 11:08:17 +0000 http://www.caymanreporter.com/?p=18292 You’re not the type of person to make many mistakes. And certainly not dumb mistakes. In fact, it’s my guess that you’re healthier than most. You likely exercise regularly. You watch what you eat. You keep up-to-date on the latest health concerns. You don’t binge on sugar. And you never – ever – eat fast […]

The post 5 mistakes healthy people make appeared first on The Cayman Reporter.

]]>
Ernest Ebanks - Body Sculptor Fitness Centre, Caymanian Village

Ernest Ebanks – Body Sculptor Fitness Centre, Caymanian Village

You’re not the type of person to make many mistakes. And certainly not dumb mistakes. In fact, it’s my guess that you’re healthier than most.

You likely exercise regularly. You watch what you eat. You keep up-to-date on the latest health concerns. You don’t binge on sugar.

And you never – ever – eat fast food. Well, almost never.

But you do have a few unhealthy skeletons in your closet – ones that you probably aren’t even aware of.

The following 5 Dumb Mistakes are frequently committed by health conscious people. Once you break these bad habits, you’ll find that achieving your weight loss goals just became a whole lot easier.

1. You’re Sleep Deprived

  • In Gallup Poll surveys, 56% of the adult population reported that drowsiness is a problem in the daytime. That means that more than half of the population doesn’t get adequate sleep.
  • Healthy adults require 7-8 hours of sleep each night. When you fail to meet this need your body goes into sleep debt, which continues to accumulate indefinitely until you catch up.
  • A lack of sleep negatively affects your immune system, your nervous system, and interferes with healthy hormone release and cellular repairs.

The best way to combat sleep deprivation is to set a scheduled bedtime. Your body will benefit from a consistent sleeping and waking routine, and you’re sure to get all the rest you need.

If you have trouble falling asleep once you’re in bed, then try these two tips. First, make sure that you don’t drink any caffeinated beverages after lunchtime. Second, don’t eat for three hours before you go to bed. This helps eliminate sleeplessness due to indigestion, and will also turbo-charge your weight loss.

2. You’re Dehydrated

  • It has been said that 75 percent of the population is chronically dehydrated. Would you disagree? When was the last time that you actually drank 8 glasses of water in a day?
  • Dehydration occurs when more fluid leaves your body than is taken in. Symptoms include: fatigue, irritability, headaches, nausea, rapid heart rate, and, in extreme cases, even death.
  • Dehydration also slows your metabolism, which hinders weight loss.

You shouldn’t wait until the feeling of thirst or dry mouth hits you, at that point damage has already been done. Instead, constantly rehydrate throughout your day to avoid dehydration. The best way to do this is to incorporate water into your daily schedule. Have a water bottle at your desk and train yourself to sip on it often, and get into the habit of drinking a full glass of water with each meal and snack.

3. You’re Stressed Out

  • I don’t have to tell you that we are living in a fast-paced world and that most of us have stress levels that are through the roof. But what you might not realize is that your stress levels are making you fat.
  • Stress creates an increase in the hormone cortisol, and chronic stress creates a chronic increase in cortisol. This is a problem because is slows your metabolism, leads to cravings and is linked to greater levels of abdominal fat storage.
  • The vicious cycle of stress and weight gain goes around and around. Stress causes you to eat emotionally, and your raised cortisol levels cause that food to be stored as fat.

One of the most effective ways to instantly eliminate stress is to sit down and write out a list of all the things that are bothering you. This should include things that you need to get done, issues that weigh on your mind and anything you believe contributes to your stress level. Once it’s all down on paper, organize it like a to-do list and start resolving each item. Doing so will get the stress off of your mind and will put your body into the motion of resolving each issue.

4. You Eat Out Too Often

  • Research suggests that most people eat out one out of every 4 meals and snacks. That’s an average of once a day.
  • Restaurant food is designed to do one thing: to taste good. In order to increase eating pleasure, each item is loaded with fat, salt and sugar. This causes you to eat way more calories than you actually need.
  • Even when you order ‘healthy’ items, you’re still taking in more calories and fat grams than you would if you had prepared the item at home. Imagine the last salad you ordered out. Didn’t it come with cream dressing, croutons, cheese sprinkles and a piece of butter-laden bread on the side?

The main reason people eat out is for convenience, so with a little organization you’ll find that preparing your own meals takes less time than you thought it would. On the weekend sit down and plan out your meals for the week. Then go to the grocery store and stock up on everything you’ll need for those meals.

Pack your lunch and snacks each night before bed, then grab it on your way out the door in the morning. When you prepare dinner at home, make enough for at least the next day as well. Your efforts will pay off both in terms of weight loss and in money saved.

5. You’re on Exercise Autopilot

  • You do the same thing each and every time you exercise. Same machines, same pace, same duration. While your routine sure feels comfortable, your results have long since halted.
  • A plateau occurs when your body adapts to your routine and weight loss stops. It is incredibly frustrating, and totally avoidable.
  • You don’t have to increase the amount of time that you spend exercising in order to see quicker, faster results. It’s all about challenging your body.

There are two simple ways to instantly increase the effectiveness of your exercise routine. First, increase your pace. Secondly, increase your intensity. Constantly vary your speed and intensity in order to keep your muscles guessing and adapting.

Another way to break through the exercise plateau is to do something totally new. If you regularly use weight machines then start using free weights. If you normally jog on the treadmill then start using the bike.

Are you ready to break the plateau as you take your routine to the next level?

Would you like to know without a shadow of a doubt that you are going to lose weight in the coming months?

It’s my goal to see you achieve greatness. I believe that you’ve got what it takes.

Let’s do this! Call 939-5288, 746-3432 or email me today at caymanfitbody@gmail.com  to get started on the fitness program that will improve your health and well being, and will get you amazing results.

Don’t make a mistake…contact me today!

The post 5 mistakes healthy people make appeared first on The Cayman Reporter.

]]>
http://www.caymanreporter.com/2015/09/24/5-mistakes-healthy-people-make/feed/ 1
Heath City offers neuro-spinal services http://www.caymanreporter.com/2015/09/24/heath-city-offers-neuro-spinal-services/ http://www.caymanreporter.com/2015/09/24/heath-city-offers-neuro-spinal-services/#comments Thu, 24 Sep 2015 11:07:04 +0000 http://www.caymanreporter.com/?p=18295 Health City Cayman Islands is continually working to improve services to Caymanians. On 17 September, Health City announced it will be equipped to offer a wide range of neuro-spinal procedures, overseen by a team of certified neuro-spinal surgeons. According to Dr Komal Prasad, Consultant Neurosurgeon and Spinal Surgeon, there is a common misconception that neurosurgeons […]

The post Heath City offers neuro-spinal services appeared first on The Cayman Reporter.

]]>
Dr Komal Prasad is the Consultant Neurosurgeon and Spinal Surgeon for Health City Cayman Islands

Dr Komal Prasad is the Consultant Neurosurgeon and Spinal Surgeon for Health City Cayman Islands

Health City Cayman Islands is continually working to improve services to Caymanians. On 17 September, Health City announced it will be equipped to offer a wide range of neuro-spinal procedures, overseen by a team of certified neuro-spinal surgeons.

According to Dr Komal Prasad, Consultant Neurosurgeon and Spinal Surgeon, there is a common misconception that neurosurgeons only perform brain surgery. However neurosurgeons are the only physicians who treat the entire spine as well, including the spinal cord.

Services at Heath City will include the treatment of various conditions of the brain, such as brain tumours and aneurysms as well as back and neck problems.

“Choosing a neurosurgeon for your brain as well as your spine health will ensure you’re getting the most experienced and relevant medical attention,” Dr Prasad stated.

Not only is Heath City equipped with state-of-the-art operating microscope for various minimally invasive brain and spinal procedures, it also offers treatment for various diseases of the brain. These can include brain tumours and spinal conditions like neck pain, back pain, surgery for herniated discs and sciatica.

Dr Prasad explained, “The minimally invasive approach we use result in smaller scars, shorter recovery times, less post-operative pain and shorter hospital stays.  In fact, many patients are home within 24 hours after this kind of minimally invasive spinal procedure.”

Health City began neural-spinal services on 14 September, offering patients with brain or spinal health issues a world-class specialist treatment at an affordable price.

To speak to a member of Health City’s Patient Care team and learn more about the Neurosurgery services, please call 1 (345) 945-4040, 1 (345) 640-4040 or visit: healthcitycaymanislands.com.

The post Heath City offers neuro-spinal services appeared first on The Cayman Reporter.

]]>
http://www.caymanreporter.com/2015/09/24/heath-city-offers-neuro-spinal-services/feed/ 0
We should all care about carbon emissions http://www.caymanreporter.com/2015/09/24/care-carbon-emissions/ http://www.caymanreporter.com/2015/09/24/care-carbon-emissions/#comments Thu, 24 Sep 2015 11:06:42 +0000 http://www.caymanreporter.com/?p=18299 Graham Morse Monday, 22 September was the world zero emissions day. I only know this because I was invited to the launch of Island Offsets, a program created by the National Trust and GreenTech to help corporations to reduce their carbon footprint. It is a local version of the carbon trading schemes which have become […]

The post We should all care about carbon emissions appeared first on The Cayman Reporter.

]]>
Graham Morse

Graham Morse

Graham Morse

Monday, 22 September was the world zero emissions day. I only know this because I was invited to the launch of Island Offsets, a program created by the National Trust and GreenTech to help corporations to reduce their carbon footprint. It is a local version of the carbon trading schemes which have become increasingly well supported worldwide as businesses and other organisations see the benefits of playing their part in reducing carbon emissions and mitigating the disastrous effects of climate change.

The principle is simple enough. A business in Cayman can offset all or part of the emissions associated with their electricity use by helping to purchase solar arrays at a Project Green School that will reduce energy used by that school in direct proportion to their offset.

It is not just the big corporations that use carbon trading to meet their carbon reduction goals. The rock band Coldplay uses it to offset their carbon emissions from high energy pop concerts and world girdling air travel by exchanging them for tree planting in the rain forests of Brazil. But now, thanks to the National Trust and GreenTech, companies can support carbon reduction with projects here in our own islands—not just providing solar panels for schools, but supporting the National Trust’s tree planting and mangrove projects.

One local company, Saxon, signed up at the launch and others have already shown interest. It is a commendable way for businesses in Cayman to demonstrate their corporate responsibility. Ah, corporate responsibility!  That brings me to Volkswagen.

This giant company, a mainstay of the German motor industry, has admitted cheating on the USA diesel emission tests by introducing software to fool the inspectors and show readings up to forty times better than they really are. Mr. Michael Horn, President and Chief Executive of Volkswagen Group of America astonishingly admitted, “Our company was dishonest . . . we have totally screwed up.” The company has set aside $6.5 billion for recalls and on top of that it is estimated that the scandal could cost the company 18 billion dollars in fines. Half a million cars are being recalled and over 11 million cars are affected. The share price has plunged by a third in two days and the German chancellor Angela Merkel has called for “full transparency.”

VW has built its brand over decades. It is a worldwide symbol of German engineering efficiency. It has projected itself as a green company and its cars as leaders in fuel emissions.  It takes years to build a brand but it can be destroyed in days. VW has broken that vital ingredient in its relationship with its customers: trust. VW may have thought concealing emissions was a trivial matter: that nobody would notice or bother. If they did they could not have been more wrong.

But what is really interesting about this story is that people care. Care about emissions. Care enough to seek out cars with low emissions. Care enough to cause a backlash on this volcanic scale. And that the US authorities care enough to put in place a robust inspection system that puts Europe to shame and care enough to fine VW billions of dollars.

Companies and other organisations in Cayman can show their customers they care about carbon emissions by signing up with Island Offsets. But if they want to earn their customers trust they need to remember that it should not just be a token. Zero emissions may an unrealistic target, even for a day, but they should take all the other measures available to them to reduce their carbon footprint by consuming less energy and utilising their roof space for solar power generation.

The post We should all care about carbon emissions appeared first on The Cayman Reporter.

]]>
http://www.caymanreporter.com/2015/09/24/care-carbon-emissions/feed/ 0